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3rd World Congress on Climate Change and Global Warming, will be organized around the theme “Earth is getting Warmer!! Challenges and Solutions for a Sustainable Environment”

Climate Congress 2017 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Climate Congress 2017

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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Carbon sequestration is a set of technologies that can greatly reduce CO2 emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants and large industrial sources. Carbon sequestration includes: Capture of CO2, Transport of the captured and compressed CO2 and Underground injection and geologic sequestration of the CO2 into deep underground rock formations. Carbon sequestration is important because it could play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while enabling low-carbon electricity generation from power plants. Carbon sequestration can significantly reduce emissions from large stationary sources of CO2, which include coal- and natural-gas-fired power plants, as well as certain industry types such as ethanol and natural gas processing plants. There are nevertheless significant drawbacks associated with reliance on geo sequestration as a major contributor to the reduction of GHG emissions in the context of climate change mitigation. A far less high-tech way is biological sequestration and it encourages organic farming practices, increased organic inputs to farm soils, and low-tillage farming systems. Not only do organically rich soils sequester CO2, they also have higher crop yields and lower fertilizer input requirements (also reducing CO2 emissions).

  • Track 1-1Non-biological methods to remove CO2 from the ambient air: artificial trees, silos full of olivine gravel, strewing olivine dust across the tropics at treetop levels
  • Track 1-2Biological method of biochar
  • Track 1-3Algae farming for CO2 removal, done in managed areas on the ocean surface
  • Track 1-4Carbon cycle
  • Track 1-5Geological sequestration
  • Track 1-6Limitations of carbon sequestration

Climatology, branch of the atmospheric sciences concerned with both the description of climate and the analysis of the causes of climatic differences and changes and their practical consequences. Climatology includes the systematic and regional studies of atmospheric conditions i.e. weather and climate. Both climatology and meteorology are branches of physical science that deal with the weather. While they are related to one another in many ways, they aren’t the same thing. Dynamic climatology is the study of large-scale patterns and how they can be used to understand global weather. Physical climatology is the study of physical processes such as evaporation, cloud formation, aerosol dispersal, and more. Paleoclimatology deals with the reconstruction of past climates using fossil evidence, ice cores, and tree rings. Climate indices are large-scale weather patterns that are consistent and measureable. The goal of an index is to combine a number of factors into a large, generalized description of either air or ocean phenomena that can be used to track the global climate system.

  • Track 2-1Climate indices and models
  • Track 2-2Physical climatology
  • Track 2-3Dynamic climatology
  • Track 2-4Paleoclimatology

The planet is warming, from North Pole to South Pole, and everywhere in between. Globally, the mercury is already up more than 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.8 degree Celsius), and even more in sensitive Polar Regions. Ice is melting worldwide, especially at the Earth’s poles. This includes mountain glaciers, ice sheets covering West Antarctica and Greenland, and Arctic sea ice. Sea level rise became faster over the last century. Precipitation (rain and snowfall) has increased across the globe, on average. The effects of global warming on the Earth's ecosystems are expected to be profound and widespread. Many species of plants and animals are already moving their range northward or to higher altitudes as a result of warming temperatures. As dramatic as the effects of climate change are expected to be on the natural world, the projected changes to human society may be even more devastating. Agricultural systems will likely be dealt a crippling blow. A study has shown that though CO2 can increase the growth of plants, the plants may become less nutritious. The effect of global warming on human health is also expected to be serious. An increase rise in cases of chronic conditions like asthma, are already occurring, most likely as a direct result of global warming.

  • Track 3-1Extreme weather events
  • Track 3-2Melting of glaciers and polar ice caps
  • Track 3-3Sea levels and ocean acidification
  • Track 3-4Effects on biodiversity
  • Track 3-5Effects on humans

Pollution is the presence of a pollutant in the environment and is often the result of human actions. Pollution has a detrimental effect on the environment. Animals, fish and other aquatic life, plants and humans all suffer when pollution is not controlled. One of the greatest problems that the world is facing today is that of environmental pollution, increasing with every passing year and causing grave and irreparable damage to the earth. In some cases, air pollutants contribute to climate change, and greenhouse gases contribute to air pollution. Climate change itself may have a direct impact on air quality. Marine pollution occurs when harmful, or potentially harmful, effects result from the entry into the ocean of chemicals, particles, industrial, agricultural and residential waste, noise, or the spread of invasive organisms. Most sources of marine pollution are land based. Marine environment is adversely affected by marine pollution. The release of greenhouse gases cause the ocean to become warmer and  causes the marine climate to become unfriendly resulting in damage to the marine ecosystem and marine life.

  • Track 4-1Causes of air pollution
  • Track 4-2Marine pollution
  • Track 4-3Land degradation
  • Track 4-4Air quality and climate change

The effects of human-incited climate changes are expanding across the country. We have observed atmosphere related increments in our presentation to raised temperatures; more successive, serious, or longer-enduring outrageous occasions; corrupted air quality; diseases transmitted through food, water, and infection vectors and stresses to our mental health and well-being. All of these dangers are required to intensify with proceeded with climate change. The impacts of climate and atmosphere on human wellbeing are critical and differed. Exposure to health hazards related to climate change affects different people and different communities to different degrees. Climate change can therefore affect human health in two principle routes: By changing the seriousness or recurrence of health issues that are as of now influenced by atmosphere or climate elements; and second, by making phenomenal or unforeseen health issues or health threats in spots where they have not previously occurred.

  • Track 5-1Cardiovascular and respiratory disease
  • Track 5-2Increase in malnutrition and under nutrition
  • Track 5-3Water-borne diseases
  • Track 5-4Foodborne diseases and nutrition
  • Track 5-5UV radiation- induced skin cancers
  • Track 5-6Exposure to toxic chemicals causing lung cancer
  • Track 5-7Temperature related deaths and illness

Climate change is the most significant challenge to achieving sustainable development, and it threatens to drag a huge number of individuals into grinding poverty. Climate change is just a long-term issue. It is going on today, and it involves instabilities for policy makers attempting to shape the future. Sustainability is no longer just a fashionable word. It is an organized way to achieving a holistic and triple bottom line growth. Apart from risk identification and mitigation, as well as a significant improvement in the efficiency of processes and systems for optimization of resources, the other proven tangible and intangible benefits of sustainability include its positive impact on employees’ morale, an organization being recognized as an employer of choice, supply chains being motivated to adopt leading practices and consumers being educated on the importance of responsible behaviour. After years of it being perceived as cost-centric, we are now finally realizing the true value-addition made by implementation of sustainability-related measures.

  • Track 6-1Sustainable urbanization
  • Track 6-2Sustainable development
  • Track 6-3UN framework on Climate change
  • Track 6-4Minimum ecological disruption
  • Track 6-5Challenge of de-carbonization
  • Track 6-6Sustainability in adaption
  • Track 6-7Sustainable management of natural resources
  • Track 6-8Sustained technology

Climate change may not be responsible for the recent skyrocketing cost of natural disasters, but it is very likely that it will impact future catastrophes. Climate models provide a glimpse of the future, and while they do not agree on all of the details, most models predict a few general trends. First, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will probably boost temperatures over most land surfaces, though the exact change will vary regionally. More uncertain but possible outcomes of an increase in global temperatures include increased risk of drought and increased intensity of storms, including tropical cyclones with higher wind speeds, a wetter Asian monsoon, and, possibly, more intense mid-latitude storms. An increase in the frequency of floods, desertification and droughts, forest fire events is very likely. Agriculture also receives the impact of these hazards and causes economic losses of billions annually.

  • Track 7-1Floods
  • Track 7-2Desertification and drought
  • Track 7-3Agriculture and forest changes
  • Track 7-4Heat waves

Emissions of greenhouse gases have a global impact, unlike some other forms of pollution. Whether they are emitted in Asia, Africa, Europe, or the Americas, they rapidly disperse evenly across the globe. This is one reason why efforts to address climate change have been through international collaboration and agreement. Although climate change agreements emphasising carbon emission reduction have been reached through international approaches, the policy measures to meet the obligations and objectives set by such agreements have been implemented at the national or regional level. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to keep global warming below 2 °C, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) must be halved by 2050 (compared with 1990 levels). Developed countries will need to reduce more – between 80 % and 95 % by 2050; advanced developing countries with large emissions (e.g. China, India and Brazil) will have to limit their emission growth. 

  • Track 8-1Joint implementation
  • Track 8-2The clean development mechanism
  • Track 8-3Emissions trading
  • Track 8-4Post Paris climate policies

Climate refugees are people who must leave their homes and communities because of the effects of climate change and global warming. Climate refugees, also known by dozens of other names, including environmental refugees, eco-migrants, environmental migrants and environmental displacees. Climate refugees belong to a larger group of immigrants known as environmental refugees. Environmental refugees include immigrants forced to flee because of natural disasters, such as volcanoes and tsunamis. More than 13 million Americans could become climate refugees by 2100 if the worst sea-level rise comes to pass, new research suggests. Environmental refugees are a particularly difficult problem for governments and policy-makers to cope with due to the variety of environmental disasters that can have dramatic impacts on the forced migration of people. Additionally, many of the states most gravely affected by environmental disasters and resulting migration are in the developing world, meaning they may lack resources to adequately address the detrimental effects of these crises.

  • Track 9-1Climate change and forced migration
  • Track 9-2Environmental emergency migrants
  • Track 9-3Non-climate drivers
  • Track 9-4Implications

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is the key to solving global climate change. A major way these gases get into the atmosphere is when people burn coal, oil, and natural gas for energy. Eliminating the burning of coal, oil and, eventually, natural gas helps in reducing Global warming. The easiest way to cut back on greenhouse gas emissions is simply to buy less stuff. The other solution is to be energy efficient.We have to think green when making purchases. Purchasing energy-efficient gadgets can also save both energy and money. Afforestation and forest management is one of the best climate change solution. Coal to gas fuel switching can also be done as a solution to climate change.

  • Track 10-1Reduction in fossil fuels consumption
  • Track 10-2Afforestation
  • Track 10-3Future fuels
  • Track 10-4Population control

Climate disasters or climate hazards are dangerous weather phenomena that threaten life and property. Climate change projections show that there will be continuing increases in the occurrence and severity of some extreme events by the end of the century, while for other extremes the links to climate change are more uncertain. Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) aims to reduce the damage caused by natural hazards like earthquakes, floods, droughts and cyclones, through an ethic of prevention. Disaster risk reduction includes disciplines like disaster management, disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness, but DRR is also part of sustainable development. In order for development activities to be sustainable they must also reduce disaster risk.

  • Track 11-1Hazards assessment
  • Track 11-2Strengthening policies and institutions
  • Track 11-3Risk identification and early warning
  • Track 11-4Management and disaster mitigation

Many chemical compounds present in Earth's atmosphere behave as 'greenhouse gases'. These are gases which allow direct sunlight (relative shortwave energy) to reach the Earth's surface unimpeded. As the shortwave energy (that in the visible and ultraviolet portion of the spectra) heats the surface, longer-wave (infrared) energy (heat) is reradiated to the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases absorb this energy, thereby allowing less heat to escape back to space, and 'trapping' it in the lower atmosphere. Many greenhouse gases occur naturally in the atmosphere, such as carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, and nitrous oxide, while others are synthetic. Those that are man-made include the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and Perfluorocarbons (PFCs), as well as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Atmospheric concentrations of both the natural and man-made gases have been rising over the last few centuries due to the industrial revolution. As the global population has increased and our reliance on fossil fuels (such as coal, oil and natural gas) has been firmly solidified, so emissions of these gases have risen. While gases such as carbon dioxide occur naturally in the atmosphere, through our interference with the carbon cycle (through burning forest lands, or mining and burning coal), we artificially move carbon from solid storage to its gaseous state, thereby increasing atmospheric concentrations.

  • Track 12-1Greenhouse effect
  • Track 12-2Sources of greenhouse gases
  • Track 12-3Effect on climate
  • Track 12-4Methods to combat greenhouse gas emissions

Renewable energy is becoming an increasingly important issue in today’s world. In addition to the rising cost of fossil fuels and the threat of Climate Change, there has also been positive developments in this field which include improvements in efficiency as well as diminishing prices. Renewable energy is energy that is generated from natural processes that are continuously replenished. This includes sunlight, geothermal heat, wind, tides, water, and various forms of biomass. This energy cannot be exhausted and is constantly renewed. Renewable energy plays an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. When renewable energy sources are used, the demand for fossil fuels is reduced. One major advantage with the use of renewable energy is that as it is renewable it is therefore sustainable and so will never run out. Renewable energy facilities generally require less maintenance than traditional generators. Their fuel being derived from natural and available resources reduces the costs of operation. Even more importantly, renewable energy produces little or no waste products such as carbon dioxide or other chemical pollutants, so has minimal impact on the environment.

  • Track 13-1Solar
  • Track 13-2Wind power
  • Track 13-3Hydroelectric energy
  • Track 13-4Biomass
  • Track 13-5Hydrogen and fuel cells
  • Track 13-6Geothermal power

Bioenergy is energy derived from biomass which includes biological material such as plants and animals, wood, waste, (hydrogen) gas, and alcohol fuels. Bioenergy is the single largest renewable energy source today, providing 10% of world primary energy supply. The use of biomass energy has the potential to greatly reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass generates about the same amount of carbon dioxide as fossil fuels, but every time a new plant grows, carbon dioxide is actually removed from the atmosphere. The net emission of carbon dioxide will be zero as long as plants continue to be replenished for biomass energy purposes. Bio-hydrogen is a potential biofuel obtainable from both cultivation and from waste organic materials. Though hydrogen is produced from non-renewable technologies such as steam reformation of natural gas (~50% of global H2 supply), petroleum refining (~30%) and gasification of coal (~20%), green algae and cyanobacteria offer an alternative route to renewable H2 production. Steam reforming of methane (biogas) produced by anaerobic digestion of organic waste, can be utilized for bio-hydrogen as well.  Bio-plastics are any plastic material that is either bio-based, biodegradable, or features both properties. They are derived from renewable biomass sources, such as vegetable fats and oils, corn starch, or macrobiotic. Bioelectricity is the production of electric potentials and currents within/by living organisms. Biogas is made in a biogas digester. We call it a digester because it is a large tank filled with bacteria that eats (or digests) organic waste and gives a flammable gas, called biogas.

  • Track 14-1Bio-hydrogen production
  • Track 14-2Bioelectricity production
  • Track 14-3Bio-plastics: Types and Uses
  • Track 14-4Biogas

Climate change is transforming ecosystems on an extraordinary scale, at an extraordinary pace. As each species responds to its changing environment, its interactions with the physical world and the organisms around it change too.  Climate change is happening on a global scale, but the ecological impacts are often local and vary from place to place. Living things are intimately connected to their physical surroundings. Even small changes in the temperature of the air, the moisture in the soil, or the salinity of the water can have significant effects. Each species is affected by such changes individually, but those individual impacts can quickly reverberate through the intricate web of life that makes up an ecosystem. Shifts in species’ ranges (the locations in which they can survive and reproduce), and shifts in phenology (the timing of biological activities that take place seasonally) are the two important types of ecological impacts of climate change have been observed. 

  • Track 15-1Effects on biodiversity
  • Track 15-2Ecological modelling
  • Track 15-3Extinction risks
  • Track 15-4Ecological restoration

A geographic information system (GIS) lets us visualize, question, analyze, and interpret data to understand relationships, patterns, and trends. GIS benefits organizations of all sizes and in almost every industry. GIS is a broad term that can refer to a number of different technologies, processes, and methods. It is attached to many operations and has many applications related to engineering, planning, management, transport/logistics, insurance, telecommunications, and business. Remote Sensing means obtaining information about an object, area or phenomenon without coming in direct contact with it. Afforestation, reforestation and deforestation are the current Kyoto focal areas, but sustainable forest management, including certification, and the assessment and prevention of forest degradation may well be considered in the so-called post-Kyoto period. Due to size, inaccessibility of the forest resources, and international requirements for a uniform methodology, quantification of the carbon cycle components in both space and time leans heavily on remote sensing, GIS modeling and related statistical tools.

  • Track 16-1GIS and disaster management
  • Track 16-2Remote sensing, GIS and climate change
  • Track 16-3Remote sensing agriculture
  • Track 16-4Geostatistics

Climate Congress  enables a distinctive platform for converting potential ideas into great business. The present conference will bring together a broad participation came from Entrepreneurs, Proposers, Investors, International financial organizations, Business associations, academia and professionals in the field of environmental, health care and its related sciences. This investment meet facilitates the most enhanced and practical business for engaging people in to constructive discussions, evaluation and execution of promising business.